Course

English for Media Literacy

Welcome to the English for Media Literacy MOOC!

You’re joining thousands of high beginner/low-intermediate English learners from around the world. This course was developed by the University of Pennsylvania and adapted by FHI 360 for the American English (AE) E-Teacher Program, a program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State with funding from the U.S. government and implemented by FHI 360. We are excited to have you in the class and look forward to your contributions to the learning community.

Course goals

English for Media Literacy is a self-paced massively-open online course (MOOC). This course was designed for English learners at or approaching level B1 on the Common European Framework (CEFR).

During this course, you will:

  • Build your English vocabulary and improve your reading skills
  • Review basic concepts about media and media literacy
  • Investigate the evolution of mass media and weigh the pros and cons of social media
  • Explore the world of advertising and identify targeted marketing strategies
  • Analyze sources and detect bias
  • Explore diversity representation in media messages
  • Practice your English with classmates around the world

Resources

This course has an orientation module and five content modules. A module is a collection of readings, videos, discussion forums, surveys and quizzes. Each module should take you about 3-5 hours to complete.

Take this course with you!

You can download and print all materials to study whenever and wherever you want. You can also download videos to study offline.

All downloadable material can be found in the Module Resources Pages. *You must go online to complete quizzes and participate in discussion groups.*

Course Schedule

The course runs for 12 weeks from October 21, 2019 to January 13, 2020. In order to complete the modules, participants should work on and offline for 3-5 hours every week. This is a self-paced course and assignments can be completed at any time before the close date on January 13, 2020.

How to pass this course:

There are six modules in the English for Media Literacy MOOC:

1.       Orientation: Welcome to the American English E-Teacher Program

  • Introduction to Media Literacy
    • The Evolution of Media
    • Advertising
    • Bias in the Media
    • Diversity and the Media

Each module will have one or more quizzes. Participants who satisfactorily complete all of the required quizzes with a score of 70% or above before the course close date will receive a digital badge and certificate of participation. You must complete all quizzes to receive a digital badge and certificate of participation.

Along with the quizzes, each module also has other opportunities to check your understanding and practice your language skills. These tasks are not graded or required.

Discussions

The discussion forum is your opportunity to practice communicating and interacting in English. This is the place to experiment with new language, ask questions, and explore new ideas with others who are at a similar English level (High Beginner / Low Intermediate). Discussion posts are not graded.

If you have questions about course content, please post them in the Content Support Discussion to get help from others in the course community. For technical support during the course, please reach out to the AE E-Teacher team at elamooc@fhi360.org
This MOOC is hosted by Canvas Network. Please take a minute to read Canvas Network’s Terms of Use. Good luck as you get started and we hope that you enjoy the course!

Practice Quizzes

Reading is an important skill for media literacy. We will review helpful reading strategies in Module One. In each module, one or more short articles have been included to help you practice these important strategies. Each article is followed by a short practice quiz to help you check your skills. You will receive a score upon completion of the quiz, but there is no minimum score requirement and your score will not affect your ability to pass the course.

Summary of Module Activities:

Orientation to the American English E-Teacher Program

This module provides a brief overview of the American English E-Teacher program. You will review how to use the Canvas site, get tips on how to study online, review how to pass the course and receive badges and certificates.

Lessons:

Lesson 1: The American English (AE) E-Teacher Program Lesson 2: MOOCs vs GOCs

Lesson 3: Canvas User Orientation Lesson 4a: Online Success Strategies Lesson 4b: Avoiding Plagiarism Lesson 4c: Discussion Tips for MOOCs Lesson 5: Certificates and Badges Lesson 6: Support during the MOOC

Quizzes*:

Orientation Quiz

*You must complete the Orientation Quiz with a passing score of at least 70% to proceed to the next module.

Module One: Introduction to Media Literacy

In this module, you will explore the basic concepts of media studies and the connections between media and society. we will identify the five questions to ask when analyzing media messages. We will explore useful strategies to help you read and understand media messages more clearly.

Lessons:

Lesson One: Introduction to Media Studies
Lesson Two: Strategies for Reading in English
Lesson Three: Introduction to Media Analysis

Discussion Forum:

Introductions

How often do you see and hear media messages?

Quizzes*:

Lesson One Quiz Lesson Two Quiz Lesson Three Quiz

*You must score at least 70% on each quiz to proceed to the next module

Module One Cont’d:

Practice Activities:

The following activities provide further opportunities for language practice. These are not required activities and there is no minimum passing score.

Listening Practice: Interview with a Media Expert Reading Practice: Can You Separate Fact from Fictions?

Reading Practice: Study Finds Most Americans Get Their News from Social Media

Module Two: The Evolution of Media

In Module Two, we will look at how media has changed over time. We will examine the positive and negative aspects of social media and practice using language to express our opinions.

Lessons:

Lesson Four: The Evolution of the Media Lesson Five: Comparative Adjectives

Lesson Six, Part One: Overcoming Bias, The Power of Social Media Lesson Six, Part Two: The Reliability of Social Media

Discussion Forum:

Positive Aspects of Social Media Negative Aspects of Social Media

Quizzes*:

Lesson Four Quiz Lesson Five Quiz Lesson Six Quiz

*You must score at least 70% on each quiz to proceed to the next module

Practice Activities:

The following activities provide further opportunities for language practice. These are not required activities and there is no minimum passing score.

Reading Practice: Five Ways Social Media Helps Refugees

Reading Practice: “Real or Not? Snowboarder’s Video in Question”

Module Three: Advertising and the Media

This module will focus on the world of advertising. Using the media analysis skills learned in Module 2, we will look at how advertisers target specific audiences and the different techniques they use to sell products. We will compare how advertising has changed over time. We will review how to use multiple adjectives and intensifiers to strengthen descriptive language.

Lessons:

Lesson Seven: Advertising and the Media

Lesson Eight: Language Focus: Order of Adjectives Lesson Nine: The Evolution of Advertising

Lesson Ten: Language Focus: Intensifiers (Normal vs. Strong Adjectives) Lesson Eleven: Analyzing Advertising

Discussion Forum:

The Ethics of Social Media Advertising

Quizzes*:

Lesson Seven Quiz Lesson Nine Quiz Lesson Ten Quiz

*You must score at least 70% on each quiz to proceed to the next module.

Practice Activities:

The following activities provide further opportunities for language practice. These are not required activities and there is no minimum passing score.

Listening Practice: Interview with an advertising expert Reading Practice: Internet Ads Outpace Print for the First Time Reading Practice: Advertisers Join the Search for Friends Online

Module Four: Bias in the Media

In Module Four, we will take a closer look at how media messages are created and shared. We will learn how to determine an author or publisher’s perspective on a given topic. We will learn about common types of bias and identify language you can use to express your opinion.

Lessons:

Lesson Twelve: Analyzing Sources

Lesson Thirteen: Language Focus – Expressing Opinions Using Modal Verbs Lesson Fourteen: Overcoming Media Bias

Lesson Fifteen: Connotation, Denotation, and Bias by Spin

Discussion Forum:

Who Pays for Media Messages?

Quizzes*:

Lesson Twelve Quiz
Lesson Thirteen Quiz
Lesson Fourteen Quiz
Lesson Fifteen Quiz

*You must score at least 70% on each quiz to proceed to the next module.

Practice Activities:

The following activities provide further opportunities for language practice. These are not required activities and there is no minimum passing score.

Reading Practice: For the Press, Elections are a Test of Accountability Reading Practice: Are Facebook’s Trending Topics Unfair?

Module Five: Diversity in the Media

In the final module of the course we examine how media can affect the way individual and groups of people view others. We will review adverbs of frequency and use them to talk about diversity gaps in the media. We will also explore how the media can affect the individual. We will study how to use

transition words to connect key ideas and improve your audience’s understanding.

Lessons:

Lesson Sixteen: Diversity and the Media

Lesson Seventeen: Language Focus: Using Negatives (not, no, never, hardly ever)
Lesson Eighteen: Race, Ethnicity, and Culture in the Media

Lesson Nineteen: Women in the Media
Lesson Twenty: Language Focus: Transitions
Lesson Twenty-One: Diversity and Identity

Discussion Forum:

How are Different Groups Depicted in the Media?

Quizzes*:

Lesson Sixteen and Seventeen Quiz Lesson Eighteen and Nineteen Quiz

*You must score at least 70% on each quiz to proceed to the next module.

Practice Activities

The following activities provide further opportunities for language practice. These are not required activities and there is no minimum passing score.

Reading Practice: Minorities See Improvement, Demand More Diversity on US Television Reading Practice: Native Americans Take Control of Their Story

Reading Practice: Social Media Highlights Sexism in Olympics Coverage

Policies and procedures

In the virtual classroom, learning is generated from active participation in discussion forums and the free exchange of ideas and experiences. Therefore, when communicating on the discussion board, it is important to follow a set of core principles which will help us increase the quality of online discussions, achieve group cohesion and maintain the community of practice:

  1. This course is intended for high-beginner and low-intermediate participants (at or approaching level B1 on the Common European Framework (CEFR)).
  • Try to be clear and direct. Make sure that your content title reflects the content of your post and that your post is succinct and direct
  • Post relevant content. Only post content relevant to the “English for Media Literacy” Course.

Any other content which is found to be unsuitable or irrelevant will be deleted.

  • Make it easier for colleagues to read your comments. Put a blank space at the beginning of a message and between paragraphs. Be brief and specific. This is especially important in Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) which have thousands of participants. When writing a contribution, try to keep between 50 and 100 words.
  • Be constructive. Respond to colleagues’ postings or comments in an encouraging and supportive tone. Think before you write or respond. Any criticism should be constructive – if in doubt, think about how you would feel reading a posting.
  • Be open to differences in opinion. Be open to other people’s opinions and try not to get emotional if someone disagrees with you. Make your learning experience a constructive and positive one by avoiding “flaming”. For example, CAPITAL LETTERS can be interpreted as shouting. Words are powerful and can hurt; avoid anything which could be misinterpreted in any way. Think before you push the “send” button.
  • Accept others. Accept your peers’ differences (e.g. cultural and language differences). You are

part of a community which means caring about your own progress and that of your colleagues’

  • Cite other people’s work. If you use a quote or reference in your post; make sure that you cite it

or provide a link to it.

  • No spamming. Please don’t send advertisements to your peers or use your peers’ emails in any

way other than how they intend it to be used.

Register Now

Tags
Show More

Join Us Whatsapp

ًWhatsapp

https://chat.whatsapp.com/BVs02UodaRW0JqGiuYvraM


ًTelegram

https://t.me/fullscholarships

Close